shawnali:

The first time I held a human brain in Anatomy Lab I was completely speechless. I looked at my classmates expecting a similar reaction and they looked back at me confused like…”dude let’s start identifying the structures.” I had to take a step back and let it process…in my hands was someone’s entire life. From start to finish, every memory, every emotion, every bodily control…was right there in my hands. 

Which student are you? Do you stop and reflect or do you move on with dissection?

birth, MCAT, med school apps, med school, LIFE.

(Source: thequeenbey)

Are You Up-to-Date on Current Events in Medicine?

There are countless resources available to anyone interested in medicine. Although so much is readily available, there is a common theme of uncertainty. As future physicians (or clinical providers), it becomes our responsibility to be knowledgeable and aware of the changes in medicine…

[Read more…]

Applying to Medical School: Out-of-State? Out of Luck. (Full Post on Future M.D. - The Medblog)

This is medical school,” a classmate remarked. “It’s not about who you are. It’s about how well you do in science and the MCAT.
The Changing Face of Medical School Admissions by Pauline Chen, M.D.

I had to make this after seeing this quote.

I am working very hard at what I want in life to get away from where I don’t want to be.

10 Things You Can Do Right Now to Prepare for Medical School Admissions
Guest Post By: Suzanne Miller, M.D. 

Will you be applying to medical school this cycle? Even though it’s only April and the AMCAS application (medical school’s primary application) does not open until June, there are many actions you can take right now to ensure timely submission of an outstanding application. (Read More at Future M.D.)

thisfuturemd:

“Keep studying and get that M.D.”

Still relevant. 

One of my most favorite moments in the world is when a patient asks you, ” I don’t understand this, can’t you just explain it to me?!” And then you read the orders—verbatim—and they say, “Ohhhhhh, okay it makes sense now.”

One of my most favorite moments in the world is when a patient asks you, ” I don’t understand this, can’t you just explain it to me?!” And then you read the orders—verbatim—and they say, “Ohhhhhh, okay it makes sense now.”